Are Politicians the real anti-nationals?


The DeMonetization’s latest victim – the parliament. The 2016 Winter Session of the parliament has been one of the least productive sessions for both Houses in the last 15 years, with repeated disruptions on the issue of #DeMonetization of currency. 

The ministers (both govt. and opposition) instead of finding a way to ease the crisis in whatever ways possible, spent all the time disrupting the sessions. The opposition trying to gain political points and the govt. trying to downplay, both ended up wasting the time and the tax payers money (not the black money). 

So how to fix the parliament?

  1. Play the national anthem whenever anyone attempts to disrupt the parliament 
  2. For those members who are violating the code of conduct, they should be denied the daily allowance and instead asked to pay the same as fine
  3. For the rest of the members, they should be asked to forgo their pay and their allowance
  4. Repeated offenders should be subjected to further disciplinary actions
  5. The list of offenders should be published on the website, so people get to see their leader in action or (in disruption) 

parliament

The disruptions in the parliament are nothing new and have been going on for decades now. This is precisely why this unparliamentary behavior should no longer be tolerated, after all its people’s hard earned money, not the politicians black money thats being wasted.

While its very unfortunate there has been no proper debate on DeMonetization, outside of the parliament, there have been many such informal views, opinions, debates – from the farmers to the daily wage laborers to the migrant population to the people from the Digital World, almost all of them have been forcefully asked to accept it.

But did the politicians accept #DeMonetization?

Or in other words, do the politicians and their affiliated political parties accept the DeMonetization. Lets answer this by asking the questions

  1. Are they willing to go completely cashless?
  2. Can they digitize all their political contributions?
  3. Can they declare the source of their income?
  4. Can they maintain a digital record of all their works in their constituencies?
  5. Can they disclose their election campaign spending?

The answer to all the above questions is an emphatic NO. Going by the statements of some of the ministers in the govt., should all the politicians be declared anti-nationals since they refuse to comply with DeMonetization?

Lets take this minor inconvenience to the door steps of the politicians

  • Lets declare a Digital Inconvenience Campaign
  • Call your MP and confront them on why they should not be called anti-nationals
    • Make these conversations public
  • Call PMO and ask them why political parties shouldn’t be under RTI
    • Log your calls/conversations
  • Tweet-A-Thons targeting the ministers, opposition leaders
  • Lets cause some minor digital inconvenience to the politicians

If you do agree, please share

If you would like to be part of the Digital Inconvenience Campaign, then please drop a note to suresh.e@gmail.com

Reference:

Disruptions during the Winter Session of the 16th Loksabha

  • While eight Bills were introduced in this session, only two were passed. Legislative business this session has been the lowest so far in the current Parliament (16th Lok Sabha). 
  • Winter Session 2016 was Lok Sabha’s least productive session in the 16th Lok Sabha. 
  • Lok Sabha worked for 15% of the scheduled time and Rajya Sabha for 18%. 
  • So far in the 16th Lok Sabha, the average productivity of Lok Sabha is 92% and that of Rajya Sabha is 71%.
  • Both Houses of Parliament saw repeated disruptions on the issue of demonetisation. 
  • While Lok Sabha lost 107 hours of scheduled time to disruptions, Rajya Sabha lost 101 hours.
  • Both Houses had their least productive Question Hour in the 16th Lok Sabha
    (Source:
    http://www.prsindia.org) 

General rules of procedure of parliament (source: Loksabha.nic.in)

i)shall not read any book, newspaper or letter except in connection with the business of the House;

(ii) shall not interrupt any member while speaking by disorderly expression or noises or in any other disorderly manner;
(iii) shall bow to the Chair while entering or leaving the House, and also when taking or leaving one’s own seat;
(iv) shall not pass between the Chair and any member who is speaking;
(v) shall not leave the House when the Speaker is addressing the House;
(vi) shall always address the Chair;
(vii) shall keep to one’s own usual seat while addressing the House;
(viii) shall maintain silence when not speaking in the House;
(ix) shall not obstruct proceedings, hiss or interrupt and shall avoid making running commentaries when 1[another member is speaking;]
(x) shall not applaud when a stranger enters any of the Galleries, or the Special Box; 2[(xi) shall not shout slogans in the House;
(xii) shall not sit or stand with back towards the Chair;
(xiii) shall not approach the Chair personally in the House.
(xiv) shall not wear to display badges of any kind in the House 3{except the National Flag in the form of a lapel pin or a badge};
(xv) shall not bring or display arms in the House;
(xvi) shall not display flags, emblems or any exhibits in the House;
(xvii) shall not leave the House immediately after delivering the speech;
(xviii) shall not distribute within the precincts of Parliament House any literature, questionnaire, pamphlets, press notes, leaflets, etc. not connected with the business of the House; (xix) shall not place one’s hat/cap on the desk in the House, bring boards in the Chamber for keeping files or for writing purposes, smoke or enter the House with the coat hanging on the arms;
(xx) shall not carry walking stick into the House unless permitted by the Speaker on health grounds; (xxi) shall not tear off documents in the House in protest; (xxii) shall not bring or play cassette or tape recorder in the House; and

(xxiii) shall avoid talking or laughing in Lobby loud enough to be heard in the House.

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